Non-Beta Alpha Clearing Week: David Canter, EVP, Head of the RIA Segment, Fidelity

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Ryan Morfin:
Welcome to NON-BETA ALPHA, I’m Ryan Morfin. On today’s episode, we have David Canter from Fidelity investments, talking to us about the future of the RA landscape. This is NON-BETA ALPHA. David, welcome to the show. Thanks for joining us today.
David Canter:
Well, it’s my pleasure to be here. Thank you for the kind introduction I figured I’d start with just, I don’t know, a little bit of music. How about a G chord for I’m glad to be here?
Ryan Morfin:
Let’s do it. You ask everyone on your show, a Coffee Break With Canter, what do they drink and what are they taking their coffee? So the question is thrown back at you. What are you taking your coffee?
David Canter:
So I drink a lot of coffee to start my day and I take it black. So probably two big mugs of coffee and people have heckled me for how big my coffee is. So, right now I just have an empty a mason jar. So thank you very much for asking.
Ryan Morfin:
Yeah, I put coffee in my coffee. I also take a black. Well, you’ve been doing a great show online. I’ve been watching it frequently. Just really talking about all the changes that are coming at different angles in the industry. And Fidelity, obviously a strong leader in this channel, you run the kind of RA, institutional business. Can you maybe talk a little bit about some of the changes that are occurring in the technology, regulatory and maybe the talent wars that are coming over the horizon?
David Canter:
Yeah, I’d be happy to. And one thing I would say is that I have been just so impressed with how the RAA movement has continued and has, I would actually say gathered steam over the last few months. So there’s still a secular movement toward the independent model. There’s a secular movement, not just with advisors, but with clients.
And as I like to say, I’ve been saying this for a while, there’s a bull market for advice. And I do not see that slowing down at all, Ryan. And in terms of technology, there’s more choice than ever, but while there’s more choice than ever, you need wise counsel to help you navigate this ecosystem. So whether that’s technology around risk management, whether it’s technology around model portfolios, whether it’s just your technology with respect to who will your be providers. I think that that’s where firms like yours, quite frankly, and firms like ours can help be great consultants as people are trying to navigate this space.
Ryan Morfin:
Yeah. And I think the FinTech space is definitely evolving and it’s obviously, it’s growing across the financial sector. But the IBD channel, the independent channel, the RA channel, they’re really starting to, as they continue to grow, attract higher quality institutional tech players. What is Fidelity doing in terms of your tech stack going forward? I know you guys have historically spent a lot of money on tech. Where are the areas that you guys are most focused on investing back into the tech stack
David Canter:
We’re always investing in our core platform. And so that always needs care and feeding and maintenance. But I’d say there are three areas where we’ve been very focused and will continue to focus. One is, we know that advisory firms have their own solutions and they work with third parties. So we have something called our integrations exchange and that’s making sure that we have best in class integrations with all the technology that advisory firms and other wealth management firms need to integrate with.
Second, we’ve been working on a platform for managed accounts and that’s something that has required a lot of dedication, time and attention. So that’s another important area for us. And then third, we have been active with our model portfolios, our FI portfolios for those advisory firms that are looking to either outsource or are looking for assistance with their investment platform or their investment solutions.
So, what I would say in all of this, whether it’s technology, whether it’s investments, advisors really want to spend time with clients. And they’re looking for providers that can help them with the easy button around technology with investments. And Ryan, you had also ask me about talent, which is so key. There is clearly a war for talent out there, whether it’s trying to attract the best advisors, whether it’s trying to attract folks that are emerging advisers or paraplanners, or whether it’s trying to attract a more diverse and qualified set of advisors out there. And that’s something that we’ve all been focused on, many of us for a while, but there’s clearly a heightened focus on adding more diversity to this group of investment advisors in the orbit.
Ryan Morfin:
Yeah. One area that comes up a lot in the advisor conversations is just succession planning. What have you seen some of the top advisors that you talk to? How are they handling that and what investments are they making today so that they have options in the future?
David Canter:
Well, that’s a great question, but also a very complicated question. Maybe I’ll start with what hadn’t worked. So if you go back boy, five, 10 years ago, when succession planning was just starting to be in vogue, most advisors did a lot of talk, but there wasn’t a lot of action. And what I’ve seen at least in the last five years is sort of divesting succession planning from let’s call it ownership planning around the firm.
So there’s sort of two issues: who’s going to run the firm? And then who are the owners going to be? And with many big firms that have been growing, it’s hard to groom successors that have the same skill sets, but also will have the capital to provide liquidity, to provide an ownership transition for the founders. So what I’ve seen is probably three things: one, firms, rather than trying to hire talent that are going to be experienced talent, trying to groom their own.
So hiring and grooming them all pursuant to their own sets of standards, their own sort of master apprentice model. Second is you can’t deny the fact that along with that, there’s been quite an uptick in transactions in the space. So, some of it is pure M&A and there are models out there, whether it’s the Wealth Enhancement Groups, the High Towers, the Mercers, the list goes on the merchants of the world. But there’s so much choice now in terms of how you can capitalize your business for a next generation. Then the third thing that I think is worth noting is also that you can sell and move on. So if you have a small business, there are plenty of firms out there that will give you a plug and play solution. And you can sell and then exit the business, but you have a home of folks to look after your clients.
Ryan Morfin:
Yeah, no, definitely a lot more capital is coming and it’s continuing to gather steam, as you said earlier. I think the annuity like streams, the migration of high quality product and advice moving from institutional partners down to the retail capital markets has accelerated over the last few years. What are some of your, I guess, concerns for the industry? Where are some maybe areas that the industry needs to tackle? Some tough challenges that may be on the horizon?
David Canter:
Well, it’s interesting because I was very concerned that all the change that we saw in March and what would the future look like? So if you had asked me in April, for example, would we be at an S&P of 31, 3200? I probably would have been surprised. And I would have thought that all the expectations that folks have going into the year might be put on pause and that we’d be seeing a dramatic kind of retrenchment in the advisory space. So I guess we haven’t seen that, which is the positive, but I think that bodes that we should all pay attention to the following.
PART 1 OF 4 ENDS [00:10:04]
David Canter:
… all pay attention to the following. Pay attention to what your succession plan looks like now. Don’t delay. Do some very good stress testing around your revenues and profitability. Pay attention to how are you going to grow your business in an environment that may not be as in-person for the foreseeable future as it has been in the past. So, I think it’s making us all pivot and think about and put enormous attention around business development in a virtual and digital way, moreso than we probably ever had in the past.
Ryan Morfin:
Yeah. No, I think the advisors who are focused on finding new ways to gather assets and execute on lead gen in this digital marketing environment are going to be the ones who stand out and grab market share. And I talk to advisors all the time. A lot of them are saying, hey, I’m going to have my best year ever. So many people are beating down my door. And I think some advisors are still scratching their head, trying to figure out how they do their next investment seminar. And I’m like, we’re going to have to change the formula here.
How is Fidelity looking at the wirehouse? You guys are huge recruiters out of the wirehouses and helping them find their freedom and independence. How has that been going over the last few months? And how have you guys changed or shifted your kind of business development strategies, given the environment that we’re in?
David Canter:
Yeah. So, we’ve been very fortunate in that we came into this period with a very robust pipeline of folks who wanted to explore independence or actually had been planning for independence. And so, we’ve been very busy. We generally are not on site, but we’ve been working on and have executed virtual implementation. So, we’ll use Zoom. We’ll use electronic means to open up accounts and prepare for account opening through DocuSign and other means. So, I think the team has done a wonderful job. We spent time auditing and preparing lists of what’s different with a virtual onboarding versus the old fashioned way where we would help out in person in an advisor’s office.
And, from a new business perspective, I guess the trend that we’ve seen, as we look out is, it’s probably a great time to consider, if you want to go independent, who are some folks you can partner with? So, probably you’re going to see more partnering with either existing platforms or outsourcing providers, or again, systems that can make an advisor’s life easier, but they don’t have to necessarily build it all themselves from scratch. And that’s been around for a long time. So, whether it’s not wanting to look after benefits programs, look after compliance, there are all these solutions that advisors can take advantage of.
One thing that’ll be interesting to see is what the new breakaways do in terms of new office space. So, that’s going to be something that we’re all going to have to watch and see how that evolves.
Ryan Morfin:
Yeah. Morgan Stanley’s James Gorman just came out and said he doesn’t know if that real estate footprint is going to be the future. And I think he was talking about the wealth management aspects of it. The reps you guys are talking to that are leaving the wirehouses, they’re all, I think, having to evolve how they work in the future. Do you think that the wirehouses are going to reduce their real estate footprints going forward now that the genie is out of the bottle?
David Canter:
I actually just… I don’t know the answer to that. I sort of have two schools of thoughts there. One is, we all can be very efficient working from home, or working remotely, whatever your situation is. But, on the flip side, humans have short memories. So, once this pandemic period is over, one school of thought is we just rush back into our old habits. As I like to say, the pandemic of 1918 gave way to the roaring ’20s.
Ryan Morfin:
Yeah. And there’s some fascinating corollaries that exist. Fighting about masks in 1918, and then again in 2020. It’s funny how much things change but they stay the same. Going back to the wirehouses, just a question on how you look at the landscape going forward. We were kind of perplexed, but we thought it was an interesting time for Goldman buying United Capital and Morgan Stanley buying E*trade. How do you look at that? I mean, is it just a fundamental admission that the independent RA model has won and now the wirehouses have to try to figure out a strategy to play? Are they trying to become custodians themselves? I mean, how do you look at the wirehouses moves they’ve made in the last 12 months? Because I think those are some sizable transactions that have shifted perspectives in the industry.
David Canter:
I’d start with… you’ve touched on some areas of what I call industrial logic. So, I think I have maybe three or four points there that I’d make. I think point one, from an industrial logic standpoint, there’s probably too much capacity in some areas of the wealth management ecosystem. So, we’ll probably see the mergers that will address capacity. And I think that you brought up some good examples and there are others.
I think industrial logic point two is, you’ll see more and more linkage between folks that have access to retirement plan participants and helping them figure out what is going to be their wealth management solution as they roll out of those plans. I think an example of that is the Edelman Financial Engines platform and the merger work that they’ve done over the years.
I think industrial logic number three is, you’re absolutely right. Some of these big platforms have seen the attractiveness of independent wealth management. So, if there are ways to partner with wealth management firms and pursue a segmented approach to the marketplace, I think that that is something that we should all continue to look for.
And then, I think industrial logic number four is, and you’re starting to see this play out if you look at some of the mergers, firms that have traditionally been asset management oriented are now buying wealth managers. So, a firm called CI Financial based out of Canada has made some investments in wealth management firms here in the U.S. And they’re starting to make a splash. You could also look at Eaton Vance, for example, has been active in the wealth space. So, those are the four areas of what I would call industrial logic that I don’t know if they are trends, but they certainly could be coming out and out trends.
The fifth, and I’ve been saying this for a while, is the TAMP space. And there’s been a lot of activity in the TAMP space over the past three or four years. Buckingham Asset Management/BAM Advisor Services did a deal with the old Loring Ward. AssetMark went public. Orion and Brinker have now merged under the auspices of two partner private equity firms. So, I think everybody’s roads are all the same. How can you kind of fit together investors who need advice with wealth managers? How can you make it automated? And, as I’ve said before, the TAMP space seems to be quite interesting.
Ryan Morfin:
And what we’re seeing, I think, across the board, as platforms achieve scale, pricing is also taking a hit, and meaning it’s coming down. What are your thoughts on some of the pricing models that have been announced? I mean, it may have led to Schwab buying TD, this race to zero. How do you guys think about the pricing model and the custody landscape? And how does that impact advisors in the longterm?
David Canter:
Well, I think the great thing about pricing models in the custody space is we’ve taken a lot of cost out to the consumer. And, as you know, the pricing models in the advisor custody space have all been predicated on the fact that they are based on the investments that an advisor makes on behalf of the investor in a brokerage account. And last year, for the most part, commissions were taken out of the system for ETFs, options, and equity.
PART 2 OF 4 ENDS [00:20:04]
David Canter:
… ETFs options and equities. And another change has been what’s happening with zero interest rate policy with the Fed. But advisors have had the advantage of not having to pay directly for these services it’s based on as a third party payer model. So for the most part, I don’t see a lot of change, but at Fidelity we relationship price our business with each advisor, because we want them to have the ability to determine how they want to avail themselves of our services. And so I see relationship pricing to be something in the future to think about the products and services that an advisor is looking to consume on behalf of their clients, and making sure that it is a relationship that works for all parties.
Ryan Morfin:
Yeah. No. That’s where I think the consumers are the ones that have been benefiting from the efficiencies. And a lot of it’s been tech-driven, it feels like, from our side of the business. Going to another question that you mentioned about compliance being a roadblock for people going independents, and there’s a lot of compliance services that are out there, but how has your view changed with REG BI, and what are your thoughts on how that’s being implemented, and what does the future of the regulatory environment look like for you?
David Canter:
Well, I think most advisors, if not all advisors, got into the business because they wanted to serve clients and they enjoyed serving clients, not because they were necessarily experts in compliance. So the ability and the availability of a compliance expert certainly makes all of this possible, and we know some good ones between the two of us. We’ve talked about them before we started taping this call. I will say that REG BI complements and in some ways is additive to the existing 40 Act requirements that advisors have to abide by. And my view is, the more that you can have compliance services help advisors demystify what their obligations are so they can help serve clients, the better.
I think we’re in a world, though, Ryan, where, let’s face it, there’s probably going to be more compliance obligations and responsibilities in the future than less. So it’s going to be an area where, as an advisory firm, scale matters, because I think the requirements and likely the costs are going to go up. So that’s why I do see a world where, as I was saying earlier, platforms, firms that can provide scale to around these requirements are going to be more successful going forward.
Ryan Morfin:
Yeah. That synthetic scale that’s now achievable is really a game changer for folks who want to go independent today. Couldn’t agree with you more. And I do think we’re about to enter a new phase of regulatory perspective. It would be interesting to see how FINRA and the SEC play in the next, call it, five to 10 years.
But one question I had for you is, you mentioned low interest rates a moment ago, and there’s still some advisors who I talk to are still thinking 60-40 is an asset allocation model that they can talk about. What are your thoughts about the fixed income markets and producing such low returns for investors today? Where are you seeing some of the better asset allocation models out there? Or what are some of your thoughts about the fixed income equivalents that might be out there in terms of income?
David Canter:
Yeah. The investing side of the equation is not my area of expertise, but what I will tell you, just from speaking to our clients and doing some of the studies that we’ve executed on, the hunt for yield is certainly something that advisors are focused on, whether it’s dividend approaches, or we’re certainly seeing more interest in private investing alternatives. So whether it’s alternative investments themselves, or things like private equity and venture capital opportunities. But you’re right. In this low rate environment, this is something that advisors are spending their time thinking about and finding ways to differentiate.
Ryan Morfin:
Yeah, no. I think finding safe yield is going to be a critical piece of advice going forward. One question I did have for you, since you do touch a lot of high quality advisors is, when you’re having these conversations, what are some new methods or ways people are reaching out, communicating with clients, or generating new AUM gathering?
David Canter:
Well, I think what’s interesting is, advisors are innovators, and they’re willing to try new things. So we’re all aware of Zoom, and I think we’ve all learned how to navigate Zoom, but some are actually holding classes on how to actually be better at Zoom. It’s not like it’s all intuitive, and there’s a lot of Zoom functionality. I’ve seen engagement strategies such as cooking classes, virtual live cooking classes that advisors have used. Other ways to get information that not are necessarily around investing topics, so whether it’s even exercise classes with clients, or other sort of interest areas. Some even are on health care, how to think about health care in this environment. Because remember, the trusted advisor is going up the value stack and helping clients with all areas of their lives.
And then you can’t also ignore that in this environment, you’re seeing more and more advisors who are doing Zoom meetings with an existing client and a prospect that they’re bringing to the table. So I think we’re in the era of more and more engagement with those centers of influence, whether it’s existing clients or other partners. I don’t know. I guess you’ve been doing such a good job asking me these questions. Let me turn the tables. What are some of the ways that you’ve seen with all the advisors you work with around new and innovative business development?
Ryan Morfin:
Yeah. No. I think it’s the advisors that we’re seeing that are outperforming. And there are a lot of different ways to get to the same outcome, but it’s the folks that I think are creating digital content and owning their digital real estate. The local search for, “Find a financial advisor near me.” And I think a lot of folks may not be happy with the communication from their old advisors, may not be happy with some of the product mix they have access to. They want some non-beta alpha. And I think people that can educate consumers today with digital and video content are going to be the ones that people learn to trust. And then when they need to make a call to action decision, they’ll go to that platform that they got educated on.
And so I think it’s about getting that hook and it’s about taking people through a journey to make sure that they understand what their needs are, whether they know the needs up front or not. And trying to be the educated education source so that consumers, especially millennials, who are so apt at doing research before they reach out, because they want to be an educated consumer, are able to build that relationship prior to even meeting an advisor.
But the hard part and the technical part is making sure you’ve got all the metrics and all the ad technology behind you, so that as Mr. or Mrs. Consumer is going through, you can grab that data, and you now know that individual has seen five of your videos. You know which five, and so you know what to lead with. And so a lot of plumbing goes on in the back from website development and things like that, and so we’ve been helping with that, and it’s not that expensive as you would think. I think technology, that inflation has not really kind of been into tech services lately. And so I think that’s a huge area where advisors who really embrace this digital moment are able to outperform.
Well, let me ask you one final question. I mean, you lead a big organization. How has this pandemic, how have you thought about leadership, and how are you communicating with your team, and what are you seeing from kind of a leader’s perspective? Because a lot of the viewers we have here manage teams, and what advice might you have for them from a Fidelity perspective?
David Canter:
Yeah. Well, it’s funny. I just came from a virtual lunch round table with six associates, and I always ask that question. I always ask the question, “What advice do you have for me? What could we be doing more of?” And when we’re in this virtual world, and we’re not in physical space, whether you work in the same office, or in the past, I could travel, you lose that hallway-
PART 3 OF 4 ENDS [00:30:04]
David Canter:
… In the same office or in the past, I could travel, you lose that hallway time. You lose that water cooler time. So I’ve gotten some great advice. One is, make sure you visit and engage with those folks that you don’t have meetings with on a regular basis. So seek out those folks that you don’t always have a chance to visit with and have personal meetings with them.
I also got a great piece of advice from a client, when you don’t have water cooler time, but how can you get folks to engage? They have a system they call the random lunch generator. So bringing people in diverse teams or different teams throughout your company so that you actually do get that networking time. And they figured out a way to arrange people at random. And I also joke that the name of my next rock band, I’d like to be random lunch generator.
But let me turn the tables then too. I know this is the final question. I’d love to hear how you’ve thought about that.
Ryan Morfin:
Yeah. We’ve done everything from virtual happy hours where we have speakers come on and talk about exercise or nutrition. And we assign a small group of people to create that content for the rest of the organization. And sometimes those have been surprisingly long Zoom calls, which is great, because people enjoy talking to each other and people are having fun. We do daily communication. So every day there’s a daily standup meeting where we talk about our values. And it’s five, 10 minutes. We talk about industry news. And then I spend a little bit of time thinking through content that we want to push out to all the employees and the advisors on a daily brief video. And a lot of it’s been video. So we’ve invested a lot into kind of cameras and lighting. And I’ve helped a lot of people download Zoom on their phones, but I think it’s being patient with folks and letting them know that it’s okay not to be okay during this kind of lockdown, and letting them know there’s some support out there to talk, because I’m trying to remind our team to check in on their people, given kind of the stress that may be abnormal from working from home, need to have a lot of patience today.
David Canter:
Well put, well put, and I like the way you phrased that. It’s okay not to be okay.
Ryan Morfin:
Yeah. Working from home, the one thing I’ve realized is that all teachers need raises.
All right. One final question. Is there any books that you’ve been reading in helping shape your thoughts going forward?
David Canter:
I’ve been an avid podcast listener, from business to pleasure. And I’ve always enjoyed podcasts that actually do talk about business. So one podcast that I recommend to everybody, and it’s not a new one, but it’s called StartUp by Gimlet Media. And for anybody who’s running a business or thinking about a business, many are small businesses, I recommend StartUp. It’s absolutely excellent. And I will tell you that you’ll learn a lot.
Ryan Morfin:
Fantastic. Well, the one podcast that nobody should miss is Coffee Break with Canter. And so David, thank you so much for joining us, being part of this conversation, and thanks for your leadership in the industry. It’s really made a difference to a lot of us.
David Canter:
Well thank you for having me and thank you too, I’m honored to be here and wish you all the best on your continued success.
Ryan Morfin:
Thank you very much. Have a great day.
Fantastic. Thank you, David. I think that was the first track of the new band name, Random Lunch Generator.
Speaker 1:
All right, guys. Talk to you soon.
Speaker 2:
Take care.
Speaker 1:
Okay.
Speaker 2:
Be safe, talk to you soon.
Speaker 1:
Bye bye.
Speaker 3:
Bye.
Ryan Morfin:
Thanks for watching No- Beta Alpha Clearing Week. And before we go, please remember to like and subscribe on Apple podcasts and our YouTube channel. This is Non-Beta Alpha. And now you know.
Speaker 4:
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